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20121029
20121029
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion? >>> and this breast cancer awareness month, kim lawton talks with evangelical author and speaker joni eareckson tada about her battle with cancer. >>> also, muslim children in virginia learning about the hajj by pretending to make the pilgrimage themselves. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. more than 3 million muslims from around the world traveled to mecca this week for the hajj, the annual pilgrimage all able muslims are called upon to perform once in their lifetime. pilgrims take part in a series of rituals that recall events from the lives of abraham and the prophet muhammad. on friday, muslims began observing the three days of eid-al-adha or the festival of sacrifice. some sacrifice animals such as sheep or cows to recall abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son in obedience to god. >>> in a major speech on poverty, vice-presidential candidate paul ryan this week praised religious charities, while blasting federal anti-poverty programs, he charged they create what he called a "debilitating culture of dependency." sister simone campbell, leader
great class here on islam- we're going to be asking another world religion to help us understand the doctrinal dimension. but we're having so much fun and we've had such an interesting set of classes that i'd just like throw it out- whatever "it" is- once again to this great audience, and any observations you've had since we last met that bring up some of our key class themes- we're always getting some interesting comments here. yeah, virginia? >> i wasn't going to say anything this week. however- >> why not? >> i've found that- i opened new yorker, and here are political cartoons on our meditation- one thing, it says, "our journey." you know, he says, "have we arrived yet?"- these little children sitting there in meditative poses. and when we were talking about the dome of the rock, there's a spread in the magazine about that. everything seems so current now. >> you begin to see these things once you- it reminds me of my geology class. you know, i took geology to get through my general ed, and just taking that course, it helps me see more in the natural environment, and hopefull
. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this
out there are typically democratic blue-collar working-class men and women, roman catholic in religion -- certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these were the quintessential reagan democrats. they were in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmorland and washington and corrine and further to the east -- kim-shree and fayette. those counties have a propensity to vote republican, particularly in the elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay- rights. then think of pennsylvania, draw a big t up the center of the state, fanned out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie or the northeastern part of the state, the big t -- that is the conservative area of the state. basically white, protestant, does not have a definable ethnic group in particular. once you get east of the susquehanna river, with the exception of a few counties, the demography changed sharply. let's get down to southeast -- philadelphia, heavily democratic -- democratic, but the suburban counties, and montgomery, chester, delaware, the swing tow
over." >> khan: yeah, yeah, and he's absolutely right. i think it's not religion itself. i mean, it's the baggage that comes with it, frankly, that's in the name of religion, people are doing horrible things. >> pitts: and in the pakistan of your youth, you could... whatever your faith was was acceptable. >> khan: absolutely, and not only was it acceptable, it was respected. >> pitts: the man who grew up on cricket in pakistan says his passion for american football began at the university of illinois, cheering on the fighting illini. with financial success came the opportunity to buy into the game at the highest level. khan says he leaves the football side of the business to others, but expects the best from his players. so one of his first moves was to provide them with what's said to be the best locker room in the nfl. >> khan: this is about comfort. this is about recognition. this is about setting standards. >> pitts: and in a strategy he hopes will pay dividends for the team and jacksonville, he announced plans for the jaguars to play one home game in london for the next four se
protector of freedom of religion and speech after making that movie. i saw how some of the family and kids were ridiculed. thank god it wasn't today because it was really pre-twitter and all of that. i was really alarmed by some reactions to be honest with you. we hadn't really expected that. host: what documentaries? what's the motivation? how much of it is a business versus you just like this medium? guest: it's a terrible business to be in. if i was financially motivated, i would be doing something like reality television, god forbid. no one gets into documentary motivated by the business allure or the financial allure. although, we do make a fine living at it. but, really, it's rachael and my co-director and i, we share an incredible curiosity to learn and it's incredible gift that we're giving to be able to pick up the phone, knock on someone's door, go to someone's community and say hi. please talk to me because i'm trying to tell this story. we ended up meeting people and experiencing things that most people never will. we never would. part of it's a little bit selfish because you
heretical they couldn't even imagine really the key not it is a common religion. the father of bashar al-assad had a muslim religious practice in order to become president of syria. they are quite far apart. but they share common ideology. syria has supported iran during the iran-iraq war because they hated iraq at that time. syria and iran share anti-americanism and the israeli attitude don't want a domination of architecture in terms of security of the region. so that's the shia crescent. the second is a growing sunni crescent but they still lack the pinch. this is saudi arabia's game. the crescent goes from libya for each of i'm too jourdan through the southern part of the western part of iraq and onto saudi arabia and down to the coast that i called the oil gold coast. we see selassie fighters, moving from libya and across saudi arabia, to iraq and into syria increasingly to join the victorian water. the opposition in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremist forces, which is one of the reasons it's so difficult for us to support them. saudi arabia and qatar are providing
to be built in their state. host: she brought up religion, so let's talk about the role of churches, parishes, synagogues can play in the campaign and whether they are allowed to contribute. guest: they're not criminals not contributing directly to the campaigns, just like a corporation could not contribute. so we're not seeing money come directly from religious organizations. but certainly people's beliefs, people's attitudes toward important political issues are sometimes if shaped by their religious beliefs. and they have been important to populations -- they have been important population, people you can rely on in the election, since they are older and have certain religious beliefs. but they cannot play a financial goal. host: john is a democrat. caller: i just wanted to say that bush, romney, and the republicans have set up this tax structure which helps these companies take our jobs overseas for cheaper labor. and the internet will also suck up a lot of jobs in the coming future. you can have a job almost anywhere, so all the tax money but being received, i believe, is going to go to
of religion here. but we're less directed by spirituality because in the past we have little history of our days being shaped by acts of god. someone once told me part of my the bible belt is spiritually minded is they have a farming tradition and acts of god have a direct impact on their lives. new york isn't like that but we have gained considerable experience over the past 11 years on how to pull together after tragedy. so there will be families without power and homes damaged by trees and we will help each other out and dig out and move on because that's what family does. anyone who thinks new yorkers aren't a community that looks at itself as a family doesn't know new york. sure we might toss a few elbows in line at whole foods, but what family doesn't fight sometimes? family is supposed to fight, and then come together in crisis and that's what we'll do in the face of sandy. all right. that does it for "the cycle." my brother, martin, it's yours. >> thank you. good afternoon. it's monday, october the 29th, and sandy is due to make landfall in just hours. >>> america bunkers down from
, has a lot to do with morality and religion and the fact that the -- the forces -- it's become more and more acceptable in our society to have children out of wedlock, and in particular, in the african-american community, and it's too bad. >> and the -- if social science does show anything, it is the correlation between two-parent families and achievement. >> absolutely, and, you know, that was also politically incorrect to say for a long time. i mean, that's the reason, you know, when daniel patrick pointed this out in the 1960s, he got such a fire storm of criticism, he stopped. brave a man as he was, he had nothing to do with this issue the rest of his career, but now it's becoming increasingly recognized on both sides of the aisle as roger says, you name a social pathology whether it's dropping out of school, getting into trouble with the law, you know, whatever, and there's a strong correlation between it and growing up in a home without a father. particularly, for boys. >> this gentleman right here. we're going to have to draw this to a close in a couple minutes. this is the n
i understand that. we are getting phone calls in iowa. the issue of romney's religion is an issue i raised with him when he ran a pull your years ago and its initial history sensitive about man does not like to talk about. iowa republicans are dominated by evangelical christians. they are a bit leery of mormons. they don't understand it it. they don't like to talk about it. no one will say i am not excited about mitt romney because he's a mormon, but they are aware of it. so that is an issue. it goes more to not whether someone will support mitt romney or not support mitt romney but the enthusiasm level they will bring to the campaign. that diminishes it just a bit. so that's an issue. if you look at how the campaign plays out, i think that will be one of the major deciding factors in this election, which i think is very close. and that is the enthusiasm level that each candidate can bring to the game. can mitt romney excite republican -- the republican base, which is largely evangelical christians in iowa? kendra obama excite the democratic base? barack obama excite the democratic
religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difcult work d of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of kp up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble.p he had changed his position on the vietnam war.bl >> well, you know when i came back from vietnam, i ju
he was born in a different country, like lots of other things that he said even questions on religion, i wonder -- if certain things were there, especially of course, born in a different place, then he said, which is a possibility, that would make the presidency a sham. i hope that we wouldn't find that. i would like to give the money and have those records be perfect. now, somebody said, you could offer a billion dollars and he wouldn't give the records because the records are so wrong and so terrible. i don't know that to be a fact. he has until wednesday at 5:00 o'clock to give his records. if he gives the records, $5 million to a charity of his choice. >> steve: donald trump, before you go, on a scale of one to ten what, are the odds that he'll do that before then? >> i don't want to say that. this is a serious offer. as i told you, it has tremendous momentum. you know when i was doing david letterman, one of the things he said, well, do you think he was born in this country? and i said, i really don't know. i can't answer that. i can't answer. that what about you you, i probably
about religion. if you have been going to church or synagogue or mosque or one year or 10 years or 25 years or 50 years waiting to know enough about god so you can swing into action i'm telling you that you already know enough. and you know deep in your heart that you know enough. you know what to do. jesus reminds us with every story, every parable, every teaching come every commandment we are to bring good news to the poor. we are to bring relief to the captors and let the oppressed go free and proclaim the year of the lord's favor. we are to feed the hungry and clothe the naked and we are to visit the sick and those in prison. i wonder, don't you? i wonder how many people in our great country are drowning in loneliness, hurtheard, sin doubt and despair or are unemployed and do not have health care or quality education while we who know what to do don't respond. [applause] [applause] just like jesus hometown synagogue and nazareth, every one of us every one of us of every faith tradition stands judged by our
to the last bastian of prejudice. religion. because it is a choice. we're allowed in that way. i'm trying to talk my way out of this. >> stephanie: you keep back-pedaling. all right. i'm going to start a spinning studio where everybody backpedals. rude pundit, love you honey. sue he next week. >> bye. >> stephanie: 47 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> announcer: if you turn her on she'll turn you on. >> oh, god. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." thomas jefferson said that a successful democracy depended on an informed electorate. our country's future depends on you. to help you make informed decisions, watch current tv's politically direct lineup. only on current tv. take the time to learn about the issues. don't just vote, vote smart. alright let's break it down. mom, pop it. ♪ ♪ two inches apart, becky. two inches. t-minus nine minutes. [ ding ] [ female announcer ] pillsbury cinnamon rolls. let the making begin. ♪ ♪ hmm these smell amazing, too bad the guys aren't here we're
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)